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Results Achieved With Two Groups of Subjects Who Underwent Treatment by Regression Therapy: 1998 – Herminia Prado Godoy, N. S. Carmalho, Lucia T. Maeda (Is.18)

by Herminia Prado Godoy, N. S. Carmalho, Lucia T. Maeda

Abstract

This work presents the results achieved by Regression Therapy treatment on two groups of subjects. The same procedures were applied on the two groups. Treatment consisted in performing eight psychotherapeutic sessions. Anamnesis was conducted during the first session, with a listing of problems; the second session was set aside for the establishment of the therapy’s contract and listing of grievances: emotional, physical, mental and thoughts, related to the problem chosen for therapy. From session three to seven, sessions were held using those regressive techniques adequate to the problem accessed. The closing of the case was made in the eighth session. Most of the subjects were female, holders of a university degree, considered themselves spiritualists, and stated that those problems presented for this work had not improved through other therapeutic approaches. Most complaints presented were emotional problems, phobias, physical problems, depression, and obesity. It was observed that seven cases of the first group and six cases of the second group showed total remission of symptoms after treatment.

Introduction

Regression Therapy (RT) was systemized and developed in the 70s by the American psychologists Edith Fiore and Morris Netherton and grounds itself on the thesis that “every human being in the present is the sum of experiences lived in the past, and this record which every being has printed upon him or herself reflects in his present in a way either healthy or pathological.” (Godoy, 1992)[1]

Basic tenets of RT are: RT is still being written; it complements psychology; and it is of psychotherapeutic character. (Godoy, 1992)[2]

Working hypotheses of RT are: Integrality; the human being is both a physical and a conscious being, and as such abides to physical and extra-physical laws; Immortality: the human being has an immortal conscience, which evolves towards perfection; Karma: a being may, during each life, complete its evolutionary stage or not; Unconsciousness: most human beings in the present are unaware of their conscious reality; Lucidness: every access to extra-physical realities is made in a conscious manner, and, Wakefulness: the therapist must always remain alert during the whole detailing. (Godoy, 1995)[3]

Edith Fiore (1978)[4] is responsible for the development of Regression Therapy centered on Insight, which is referred to as low impact therapy by IBRT. Therapists who follow her approach are Winafred Lucas, Hazel Denning, Brian Weiss,[5] and Helen Wambach[6].

Morris Netherton (1977)[7] is responsible for Regression Therapy centered on Catharsis, what we call the Cartharsis Therapy and IBRT calls high impact therapy. His followers are Hans Wolfgang TenDam (1997)[8], Roger Woolger (1994)[9], and Livio Túlio Pincherle (1990).[10]

Both approaches make use of hypnotic techniques, in which it is sufficient for the client to reach a light hypnotic state. Insight Therapy uses passive hypnotic techniques, and the Catharsis Therapy uses hypnotic and active techniques, where the complaint in itself is used as induction towards a state of regression.Some therapists mix both therapies in their regression work. They start regression with a passive hypnotic technique, and as soon as the traumatic moment is detected, the session is conducted aiming towards catharsis.

The bibliography in the psychotherapy field (TR) field is scarce and most of the researches do not characterize itself as scientific researches, such is the reason that made us build a theoretical referential inside these limitations. In our bibliographical review, we found in the (TR) only Ronald Van der Maesen´s (1997) research, in which positive results are described, those obtained to the treatment of a subject who presented Gilles de la Tourette’s Syndrome.

Edith Fiore has a Ph.D. in Psychology, and her religious education was always conventional, never having used or being interested in reincarnation. She works with subconscious contents, bringing them to a conscious level, and among the material present, experiences that can be considered as stemming from a past life may exist. She considers important the revival of death and after-death, for “in most cases the experience of death is the event responsible for symptoms and problems of the individual.” (Fiore, 1978)[11] She proposes Regression Therapy for the treatment of emotional disorders, behavior problems, and psychosomatic symptoms. She does not work with schizophrenics, due to their dispersed attention, since concentration is necessary for hypnosis.

Morris Netherton[12] (1985), holds a Ph.D. in Psychology, and has a Protestant background. He has been working with RT for over thirty years. He was trained in gestalt therapy and in transactional analysis. He states that RT’s goal is to free a person from a problem which comes from a past life. He works with several lives, with the goal of solving the client’s problem in this life.

He sees the unconscious as a file of all existential records, from the present and other lives of the Being. He states that events do not disappear from memory, but stay recorded in the unconscious.

For him, therapy has three crucial stages: prenatal period, birth, and death. In the prenatal period are found the roots of the client’s current behavior. He states that death and birth are similar, and that death in another life shapes the kind of birth in this life. (Netherton, 1985)[13]

The rules that Netherton established for regression work are: “everything that the client says in first place is to be worked with”; “if you don’t know what to do, ask the client,” and he emphasizes that “the client must experience and relive the trauma.” (Netherton, 1985)[14]

Justification of the Choice of Subject

Most RT authors present treatments’ results in their works, but the collected data suffer from lack of methodological treatment, which makes the technique less credible to both scientific community and general public. There is an urgent need for studies which show, obeying to strict methodology, efficacy, efficiency and seriousness of Regression Therapy, also because the general public wants to choose any therapeutic proceedings in an understanding way.

Goals

This work intended to draw a profile of persons who had submitted themselves to treatment by Regression Therapy, by means of the techniques described above; to list the most common problems presented, and by using regression techniques in five sessions, to verify the results obtained with the regressive therapeutic treatment.

Starting from the surmises established by Fiore[15] (1978), that RT lessens the number of therapeutic sessions, that it can help people solve and eliminate the problems; by TenDam[16] (1997), who points out that it is both an efficient and effective therapy; and by Netherton[17] (1997), that it “works,” it was decided to verify in practice for what kind of problems does RT “work,” is efficient and effective. Through this work, the researchers want to help increase RT credibility in the scientific community and with the general public as well.

Methodological Procedures

The research was realized by a monthly two hour session, and in the total, eight sessions were held, being one for anamnesis, one to establish the contract of therapy, five of regressive work, and one for conclusion.

Two groups of subjects were used, one composed of 17 students, who were taking the Regression Therapy Specialization Course, year 1998, CDCT-HPG, and who could be either therapists or clients, alternating themselves into these two works, during the practical stage of the course, from August to December, time considerable as the research period; and the other group composed of 17 subjects (S), who had as patients their own clinic clients.

The concept for choosing the client to become a subject of research was his acceptance in taking part in the experiment after being invited to it by the therapist in training. All subjects were informed about the research character of this psychotherapeutic work, agreeing to submit to the sessions of Regression Therapy, signing a term of authorization, which was kept with the therapist in charge. Names of the subjects were changed, and information that might lead to their identification was omitted, without compromising the research work. To all subjects was given the option of going on with the psychotherapeutic work after the eighth session, aiming to give continuity and to complement psychotherapeutic work. As an instrument of data collection it utilized a questionnaire, which collaborated with the elaboration of the subjects’ profile and the semi-structured interview, what was able to bring out the problems presented by the subjects.

To collect data to elaborate a profile, a question sheet (see attachment I) was used, which provided information regarding gender, age, duration of marriage, number of marriages, number of children, individual income, occupation, and information about three generations related to the subject (parents, subject, siblings, partners, and children).

The reasons for searching for RT treatment were asked of all subjects.

The semi-structured interview, which was used to list the subjects’ problems, contained the following questions:

Which is/are your problem(s)? (List the problems)

  1. You mentioned X problems to me (repeat all items listed), put them in decreasing order. (Write down sequence stated by client.)
  1. Which are the reasons for you seeking RT work? (For this question, in the case of the therapists, were considered the choice of problem and the reasons for choosing to be trained in RT techniques, since to subject oneself to the RT process is a demand of the regression therapist training course.)

All the sessions were taped and later literally transcribed, and the data received by them analyzed in a quantitative and qualitative way.

During the first session, the questionnaire was applied and the semi-structured interview was conducted, to be informed of the problems and the reasons that led to seeking psychotherapeutic treatment by RT.

During the second session, the contract of therapy was made. From all the problems mentioned, and using the decreasing list of these problems, the one problem chosen for regression work was the one which caused most disturbance and discomfort to the subject.

After defining the therapy contract, the specification of the problem was defined viewing all the charges: mental, emotional, somatic, and imaginative.

Then, the therapist went on to study the case, making a hypothetical diagnosis (conventional and regressive), and planning the treatment.

In the following sessions, the therapist was instructed to start the session making the following statement to the subject: our therapeutic contract was to work on X (mentioning the problem chosen for therapy); you mentioned your feelings of Y (repeating the charges noted during the second session), and what do you wish to work with during this session? With this question, the therapist aimed to establish the session’s focus.

Having this focus, the therapist proceeded to relate the charges of the session to the chosen focus. With focus and charges related and present, the therapist went on to apply RT techniques, the low impact one (Fiore) by us denominated as the insight therapy, or the high impact one (Netherton) by us denominated as the catharsis therapy.

In the last session, the regression work was evaluated and closed. During the evaluation the therapist retook the contract of therapy and the charges related to the problems chosen for treatment, asking of the subject if in that situation those charges persisted or not. If they did, the subject was asked about their intensity and frequency.

The following categories were considered for analysis of the results obtained with regression treatment: total remission of symptoms (TRS/RTS); partial remission of symptoms (PRS/RPS); and non-remission (NR).

Analysis of Data

  1. Profile of Subjects Who Submitted To The 8 Session Treatment In Regression Therapy

 Two groups of subjects were analyzed. In Group 1, 17 therapists in training in the Specialization Course for Regression Therapy at CDCT-HPG, class of 1998, were the subjects. The therapists (TS) took turns working as therapists, aiming both their training as Therapists and their experience as Subjects during the Specialization Course. Group 2 was composed of 17 subjects (S), which were chosen among the clients whom the therapists had in their own practices. The total number of analyzed subjects was 34, 17 in Group 1 and 17 in Group 2. Two of the therapists did not present the work they did with their clients.

GENDER Group 1 % Group 2 %
FEMALE 15 88.2 14 82.3
MALE 2 11.8 1 6.6
N/A 2 11.1
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 1: Gender of Subjects

 With relation to gender, it can be observed that most subjects in both groups were female.

 

AGE BRACKET Group 1 % Group 2 %
0-19
20-29 6 35.3
30-39 8 47 2 11.8
40-49 6 35.3 7 41.1
50-59 3 17.7
N/A 2 11.8
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 2: Age bracket of subjects

In this table, it can be observed that most subjects in Group 1 (47%) were in the age bracket from 30 to 39 years of age, and the subjects in Group 2 were in the bracket from 40 to 49 years of age (41.1%).

 

CIVIL STATUS Group 1 % Group 2 %
Single 4 23.53 7 41.1
Married 13 76.47 6 35.3
Divorced 2 11.8
N/A 2 11.8
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 3: Civil status

It was observed that in Group 1 there were a larger number of married subjects (76.47%) while in Group 2 there were a larger number of single subjects.

LENGTH OF MARRIAGE – CURRENT PARTNER Group 1 % Group 2 %
0-9 5 38.46 2 33.3
10-19 2 15.38 2 33.3
20-29 4 30.76 1 16.7
30-39 1 7.7 1 16.7
N/A 1 7.7
TOTAL 13 100 6 100

Table 4: Length of marriage with current partner

 Subjects in Group 1 mostly (38.46%) a length of marriage between 0 and 9 years with their current partner, while in Group 2, 33.3% had a duration from 0 to 9 years and 33.3% from 10 to 19 years of marriage to their current partner.

OCCUPATION S(UBJECT)
PSYCHOLOGIST 3
FRONT DESK ATTENDANT 2
FIREFIGHTER 1
SALES PERSON 1
STUDENT 2
SUPERVISOR 1
HOUSEWIFE 1
REIKI THERAPIST 1
TEACHER 1
BEAUTICIAN 1
DECORATOR 1

Table 6: Occupation

 Group 1 was composed of 16 psychologists and 1 physician. The occupations of psychologist, front desk attendant, and student were those most common in Group 2.

LEVEL OF EDUCATION Group 1 % Group 2 %
Elementary school 2 11.8
High school 4 23.5
College/University 17 100 9 52.9
N/A 2 11.8
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 7: Education

All subjects in Group 1 detained a college or university degree, and in Group 2 52.9% of subjects held such a degree.

 

PERSONAL INCOME (R$) Group 1 % Group 2 %
0-2000 10 8.9 12 70.6
2001-4000 4 3.5 3 17.6
4001-6000
6001-8000
8001-10000 1 5.8
N/A 2 11.8 2 11.8
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 8: Personal income

In both groups it was verified that most subjects had a personal monthly income between zero and R$2,000.00 (At time of writing, R$2,000.00 equals approx. US $1,600.00).

FAMILY INCOME (R$) Group 1 % Group 2 %
0-R$2,000.00 1 6.7 6 40
2001-4000 6 40 8 53.3
4001-6000 3 20 1 6.7
6001-8000 3 20
8001-10000 1 6.7
10001-15000 1 6.6
N/A 2 2
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 9: Family income

 Concerning family income, both groups were located in the same bracket, with R$2,001.00 to R$4,000.00 corresponding to 43.3% and 53.3%.

  

RELIGION Group 1 % Group 2 %
Not stated 1 5.8
None 2 11.8 1 5.8
Catholic 4 23.5
Spiritist 1 5.8 1 5.8
Kardecist 2 11.8
Christian 1 5.8 1 5.8
Spiritualistic, no attachment to religious group/sect 9 53 7 35.7
N/A 2 11.8 3 17.6
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 10: Religion

Regarding Religion, most subjects classified themselves as “spiritualistic,” corresponding to 53% in Group 1 and 35.7% in Group 2. To be spiritualistic was defined as “to believe in spirituality, but without being committed to any religious sect.”

 

  1. REASONS WHICH MADE SUBJECTS SEEK RT TREATMENT

 Data from the two groups were tabulated. Group 1 was composed of 17 therapists (TS) and Group 2 of 17 subjects (S) with whom the 17 therapists from Group 1 worked.

REASONS Group 1 % Group 2 %
DECLINED TO ANSWER 5 29.6 3 17.9
TREATED WITH OTHER FORMS OF THERAPY WHICH DID NOT RESOLVE PROBLEM 6 35.3 1 5.8
BELIEVES IN WORKING WITH PLT AND RT 4 23.5 1 5.8
BELIEVES IN A SPIRITUAL CAUSE 1 5.8 1 5.8
OUT OF CURIOSITY/TO GET ACQUAINTED WITH 1 5.8 2 11.8
BELIEVES IN PAST LIVES 6 35.3
BELIEVES THIS CAN HELP 1 5.8
N/A 2 11.8
TOTAL 17 100 17 100

Table 11: Reasons for which subjects sought RT treatment

Among the subjects in Group 1 (TS), 35.3% answered that they had sought out RT because treatment with other forms of psychotherapeutic work had not solved their problems and 29.6% did not answer.

In Group 2 (S), 35.3% answered that they had come to RT due to their belief in past lives, while 17.9% did not answer.

 

  1. LISTING OF MOST COMMON PROBLEMS PRESENTED BY SUBJECTS IN REGRESSION WORK AND RESULTS OBTAINED WITH TREATMENT AFTER FIVE REGRESSION SESSIONS

  GROUP 1: THERAPIST AS SUBJECT (TS) 

SPECIFIC COMPLAINTS QUANTITY RESULTS      
N/A TRS PRS NR
PROFESSIONAL INSECURITY 2 2
PROBLEMS IN DEALING WITH MONEY 1 1
TENSION IN CONFRONTING NEW SITUATIONS 1 1
FEAR OF SPEAKING IN PUBLIC 1 1
TREMORS 1 1
CLAUSTROPHOBIA 1 1
DERMATITIS 1 1
STRESS 1 1
DEPRESSION 1 1
EMOTIVITY 1 1
TACHYCARDIA 1 1
INSECURITY/ANXIETY IN FRONT OF GROUPS 1 1
OBESITY 1 1
DIFFICULTY IN COMMUNICATING WITH PEOPLE 1 1
N/A 2 2
TOTAL 17 2 6 7 2
%   11.8 35.3 41.1 11.8

Table 12: Complaints and results with RT

 


LEGEND
TRS = TOTAL REEMISSION OF SYMPTOMS
PRS = PARTIAL REMISSION OF SYMPTOMS
NR = NON-REMISSION
N/A = no data available

 

Problems presented by subjects in Group 1 were: professional insecurity, difficulty in handling money, tension when confronted with new situations, fear of speaking in public, trembling, claustrophobia, dermatitis, stress, depression, emotivity, tachycardia, insecurity and anxiety in front of groups, obesity, and difficulty in communicating with people.

Forty-one percent of subjects in Group 1 presented partial remission of the complaint’s symptoms, 35.3% total remission, and 11.8% did not show remission of symptoms.

GROUP 2: SUBJECT(s)

SPECIFIC COMPLAINTS QTY N/A RESULTS
      TRS PRS NR
DIFFICULTY IN EXPRESSING OWN OPINION 1 1
FEAR OF DRIVING CAR PAST A RIVER 1 1
OBESITY 2 1 1
NOT ACCEPTING OWN SUCCESS 1 1
PROBLEMS WITH FAMILY 1 1
FEAR OF HOSPITAL 1 1
CONCERN ABOUT THE FUTURE 1 1
FEAR OF DRIVING 1 1
FEAR OF LOVING 1 1
ANGUISH 1 1
PROFESSIONAL INDEFINITION AND INSTABILITY 1 1
EXPLANATION ABOUT HEALTH PROBLEM 1 1
RELATIONSHIP WITH FATHER 1 1
AFFECTIVE RELATIONSHIP 1 1
N/A 2
TOTAL 17 2 5 9 1
%   11.8 29.4 53 5.8

Table 13: Complaints and results (S)

 The most common problems presented by Group 2 were: difficulty in expressing own thoughts, fear of driving car close to a river, obesity, non-acceptance of success, family trouble, fear of hospitals, worries about the future, fear of driving, fear of loving, anguish, professional indefinition and instability, explanation about health problem, relationship with father, and sentimental relationship.

Fifty-three percent of subjects showed partial remission of symptoms, 29.4% total remission of symptoms, and 5.8% had no remission of symptoms.

 

CATEGORIES OF PROBLEMS RESULTS
  QTY TRS PRS NR
EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS 6 2 4
PHOBIAS 6 1 4 1
PHYSICAL PROBLEMS 4 3 1
DEPRESSION 3 2 1
OBESITY 3 2 1
COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS 2 2
PROBLEMS IN FAMILY RELATIONSHIP 2 2
NON-ACCEPTANCE OF SUCCESS 1 1
WORRY ABOUT THE FUTURE 1 1
DIFFICULTY IN DEALING WITH MONEY 1 1
PROFESSIONAL INDEFINITION AND INSTABILITY 1 1
N/A 4
TOTAL 34 11 16 3
%   32.3 47 8.8

Table 14: Categories of problems and results

Forty-Seven percent of cases treated with regression therapy techniques showed partial remission of symptoms, 32.3% had total remission; 8.8% had no remission of symptoms, and 11.9% had no recorded results.

Emotional problems and phobias were the most common problems presented by subjects. Physical problems came in second place, and depression and obesity in third place among the problems presented by subjects. Problems regarding communication and relationships came in fourth place; in fifth, non-acceptance of success, worry about the future, difficulty in dealing with money, and professional identification and instability.

Conclusion

In this research, it could be noticed that the profile of subjects seeking regression therapy was composed in both samplings of female subjects, detainees of an university degree, personal income between 0 and R$2,000.00, family income varying between R$2,001 and R$4,000, and who weren’t connected to any specific religious sect. The great majority qualified themselves as “spiritualistic,” defining this as a life philosophy. In Group 1 most subjects were concentrated in the age bracket between 30 and 39 years, 76.47% were married; of these, 66.6% were in their first marriage, with average time of marriage being between 0 and 9 years.

In Group 2, composed of clients of the therapists taking the course, most were concentrated in the bracket between 40 and 49 years of age and most (41.1%) were single.

Even if the therapists went through regressive work as one of the demands of their training course, it can be verified that 35.3% in choosing the problems to be worked with while training the RT technique said to have chosen problems which had not been solved with other psychotherapeutic interventions; also, 23.5% mentioned having decided to learn RT techniques because they believed in this work.

For Group 2 the main reason for seeking to work with regression therapy was their belief in past lives (35.3%).

The problems presented in both groups were most commonly of emotional nature (6 cases) and phobias (6 cases). Through the results it can be seen that for cases of phobias and emotional problems no remission of symptoms was verified after five regressive sessions. According to literature, remission of symptoms should be observed after one to three sessions. (Netherton, 1997[18] and TenDam, 1997)[19]

Probably, as also mentioned by TenDam (1997)[20], the non remission of symptoms happens due to the fact that, in spite of the charges being mainly physical and emotional, what suggests the presence of trauma, there exists a Complex Trauma, where trauma is joined by Hangover, Pseudo-obsession, Obsession, Character Postulates, or Alienation. (see karmic repercussions by author)[21]

This researcher constructed a hypothesis for non remission of symptoms, or their partial remission, in which there is a possibility of dealing with a case which we denominated “Existential Contention.” According to the researcher’s definition, Existential Contention means the impossibility of total disconnection with the symptoms since they act as protecting factors for the subject, so that he or she won’t submit herself to existential losses or drawbacks. In this context, as studied and investigated by the researcher, it can be stated that RT brings to Therapy of Multidimensional Consciousness, which works with the multidimensionality of consciousness, which involves: Regression Therapy, Progression Therapy, Existential Programming Therapy, Energetic Therapies, and Therapy of Subpersonalities. (Godoy, 1995)[22] This theme will be more extensively broached in a future work.

The cases which had total remission of symptoms were those which presented very specific physical signs, such as dermatitis and tachycardia, communication problems, non-acceptance of success, and difficulty in dealing with money. For these cases, one may hypothesize that Simple Trauma had a part in them. (TenDam, 1997)[23]

In the sampling, three cases showed no remission of symptoms, being one of phobia, one of depression, and one of obesity. Upon verifying these subjects’ initial complaints, it could be noticed that they simultaneously presented other associated complaints, and which had not been worked. For several complaints, one can be dealing with what Woolger [24] qualifies as “complex.”

The major goal of this research was to record results achieved with five sessions of treatment by Regression Therapy, where it could be verified that remission of symptoms was not obtained in five sessions only. This fact was considered of extreme importance, so that one no longer corroborates the often repeated statement that problems treated with Regression Therapy suffer remission in one to three sessions. According to this work, in which methodological procedures were employed, it was verified that in only 36.6% of cases remission of symptoms was total. These results show the influence of other factors so that total remission of symptoms may happen, and not only having cases with clear physical or somatic charges, those qualified as simple traumas. It could be verified that not all cases qualified as simple traumas had success after five sessions of treatment. At the same time cases considered as complex traumas had total remission of symptoms. In the future, a more detailed investigation would be appropriated here, to make clear and point out the deciding factors of achieving or not success in remission of symptoms by the use of regressive techniques.

Another suggestion for future works is the investigation with two or more groups with similar pathologies, being treated with different psychotherapeutical approaches, so that one may have parameters of RT’s efficiency when compared to other psychological therapies.

 

RESEARCHER

Name: Hermínia Prado Godoy

Affiliated to: CDCT-HPG (Center for Technological and Scientific Diffusion – Hermínia Prado Godoy S/C Ltda.)

Education: Graduation – Psychology – 1978

Specialization: Regressional Therapist – 1988

M.Sc. in Developmental Disturbances – Mackenzie University – S.Paulo

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

Name: Lucia T. Maeda

Affiliated to: CDCT-HPG (Center for Technological and Scientific Diffusion – Hermínia Prado Godoy S/C Ltda.)

Education: Graduation – Psychology – 1978

Specialization: Regressional Therapist – 1998

 

Name: Norimar Scordamaglia

Affiliated to: CDCT-HPG (Center for Technological and Scientific Diffusion – Hermínia Prado Godoy S/C Ltda.)

Education: Graduation – Psychology – 1977

Specialization: Regressional Therapist – 1998

 

ADVISER:

Name: Ana Maria de Oliveira

Affiliated to: CDCT-HPG (Center for Technological and Scientific Diffusion – Hermínia Prado Godoy S/C Ltda.)

Education: Bibliotheconomy. Studying Religious Sciences at Pontífice Universidade Católica – São Paulo (Master’s degree).

 

RESEARCH SUPERVISOR:

Rosivaldo Pellegrini

Affiliated to: Teacher at UEL – Londrina State University. Graduation in Social Science at UEL, M.Sc. in Sociology at UNESP – São Paulo State University in Araraquara.

 

 References

 Fiore, edith. Você já viveu antes. Rio de Janeiro: Record, 1978. (You Have Lived Before)

 Godoy, Herminia Prado. Classes of the Regression Therapist Course. S. Paulo: HPG, 1990 – 1998.

Maesen, Ronald van der. Gillesn de la Tourette Syndrome: effects of na alternative therapeutic approach. Monografy. Netherland, April 1, 1997.

Netherton, Morris. Seminars held in 1985 and 1995. S. Paulo

——— Vida Passada: uma abordagem psicoterápica. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997. (Past Life : a Psychotherapeutic approach)

Pincherle, Lívio Tulio (col). Terapia de Vida Passada: uma abordagem profunda do inconsciente. S. Paulo: Summus, 1990. (Past Life Therapy: A deep approach of the unconscious)

TenDam, Hans Wolfgang. Cura Profunda. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997. (Deep Cure)

 Woolger, Roger J. As várias vidas da alma. S. Paulo: Cultrix, 1994. (The several lives of the soul)

 


[1] Godoy, Herminia Prado. Aulas do Curso de Terapeuta da Regressão. S. Paulo: HPG, 1992.

[2] Godoy, H. P. 1992, op. cit.

[3] Godoy, H.P. Aulas do Curso de Terapeuta da Regressão. S. Paulo: HPG, 1995.

[4] Fiore, Edith. Você já viveu antes. Rio de Janeiro: Record, 1978. (You Have Lived Before)

5 Weiss, Brian L. Muitas Vidas, Muitos Mestres. Rio de Janeiro: Salamandra, 1991. (Many Lives Many Masters)

6 Wambach, Helen.

7 Netherton, Morris. Vida Passada: uma abordagem psicoterápica. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997. (Past Life: A Psychotherapeutic Approach)

8 TenDam, Hans Wolfgang. Cura Profunda. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997. (Deep Cure )

9 Woolger, Roger J. As várias vidas da alma. S. Paulo: Cultrix, 1994. (The Several Lives of the Soul)

10 Pincherle, Lívio Tulio (col). Terapia de Vida Passada: uma abordagem profunda do inconsciente. S. Paulo: Summus, 1990. (Past-Life Therapy: A Deep Approach of the Unconscious)

11 Fiore, Edith. Você já viveu antes. Rio de Janeiro: Record, 1978, p. 215. (You Have Lived Before)

12 Netherton, Morris. Seminars held in 1985. S. Paulo.

[13] Netherton, Morris. 1985, op. cit.

[14] Netherton, Morris. 1985, op. cit.

[15] Fiore, Edith. Você já viveu antes. Rio de Janeiro: Record, 1978, p. 12. (You Have Lived Before)

[16] TenDam, Hans Wolfgang. Cura Profunda. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997, p. 9. (Deep Cure)

[17] Netherton, Morris. Vida Passada: uma abordagem psicoterápica. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997, p.166. (Past Life: A Psychotherapeutic Approach)

[18] Netherton, Morris. Vida Passada: uma abordagem psicoterápica. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997.

(“Past Life : a Psychotherapeutic Approach” )

[19] TenDam, Hans Wolfgang. Cura Profunda. S. Paulo: Summus, 1997. (“Deep cure”)

[20] TenDam, 1997, op. cit.

[21] TenDam, 1997, op. cit.

[22] Godoy, Herminia Prado Godoy. Classes of the Regression Therapist Course. . S. Paulo: HPG, 1995.

[23] Idem TenDam, 1997.

[24] Woolger, Roger J. As várias vidas da alma. S. Paulo: Cultrix, 1994 (“The several lives of the soul”)

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Topics on this article

Depression, Obesity, Phobias, Regression Therapy, Research, Study

Keywords on this article

Anamnesis, case study