Regression Therapy

17 Jul: Future of Regression Therapy – Some Personal Views – Andy Tomlinson (Is.29)

by Andy Tomlinson

Abstract

Andy has been a Regression Therapist for over twenty years and is an international trainer for the Past Life Regression Academy and author of three books on regression therapy. He shares his thoughts and experiences about changes in regression therapy and the opportunities that are becoming available in the future includingvworking with the new vibrational energies coming into the planet.

Introduction

I remember when I was doing my four-year psychotherapy training in the 90s being told there was no need to go to the source of a client’s problem to resolve it, and a past life was dismissed as simply a metaphor. I was told hypnotherapy and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) were the future of … Read the rest

11 Oct: Past Life Therapy. Contrasting Perspectives with Traditional Psychotherapy – Dianne Seaman Poitier (Is.31)

by Dianne Seaman Poitier

Abstract

A hypothesis—there are often past life roots to present life psychological patterns.

Belief systems influence the filter through which behavior is interpreted. Regression therapy challenges several longstanding paradigms in traditional psychology. Based on a one lifetime only viewpoint, the assumption is made that the roots of behavior either stem from childhood or are a result of biochemical imbalances. The more traditional model also tends to see the unconscious as layered more linearly, with the earliest memories being the deepest and therefore hardest to access. These four past life cases present contrasting interpretations based on such belief systems models.

The ongoing debate on this subject tends to categorize opinion into two opposing camps. Most popular with … Read the rest

11 Oct: Baby Casus – Marion Boon (Is.31)

by Marion Boon

Abstract

A baby was born with active past life terrors. He comes to peace after his father works remotely for him. On June 3, 2020 the author conducted a remote session of Holographic Regression Therapy with a client who resides abroad. The client and I used either Zoom or Whatsapp to perform this remote session for his baby son.

 

On terminology and techniques:

The term Holographic Regression Therapy was introduced in the early 1980’s by Hans ten Dam (2014). I prefer to use this term to describe the modality I used in this case. Regression therapy uses modified states of consciousness and when I refer to TRT or HRT (Transpersonal or Holographic Regression Therapy) I am … Read the rest

11 Oct: Psoriasis Cured by Becoming Aware of its Origin – Bibiana Bistrich (Is.31)

by Bibiana Bistrich

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to establish a correlation between psoriasis and unresolved past life situations. This study uses Past Life Therapy as an innovative and effective approach with a dual purpose: the solution of an unresolved, traumatic past life event—whose effects remain active in the present life, and the identification of unconscious, unperceived connections between that particular event from the past and the disease suffered in this current life. The process of solving the past life conflict helps shed light on connections between psoriasis and disturbing, shocking events of the patient’s past life. By establishing those unknown connections, the patient is able to heal.
Past Life Therapy sessions consisted of three stages:

1. The … Read the rest

10 Oct: The Level of Empathy and Engagement of the Client as a Significant Factor in Regression Therapy – Peter Gadjev (Is.31)

by Peter Gadjev

Abstract

In this study the author presents the importance of the level of the client’s involvement in the therapeutic process. He defines indicators for measuring the three levels of involvement: low, medium and high. He briefly describes the results of the study and then presents factors on the part of the client and approaches on the part of the therapist, through which the level of involvement is influenced.

In sessions with a higher degree of client involvement, they report more successful results. Through the therapist’s ability to maintain a good level of involvement, the client increases their resources for a more successful therapeutic process.

During my studies at the Institute of Regression Therapy in Sofia under the … Read the rest

31 Dec: Hips and Horses – Heike Bettendorf (Is.30)

by Heike Bettendorf

Abstract

In this case the author explores a combination of body work with regression therapy and applies personification[1] and energy work to include animals.

The client:  

In April 2015 a client came to me for body training after a hip replacement, which had been done on March 2015. The 51-year-old woman had decided to recover from her operation on the island of Fuerteventura.

She had been born with Perthes disease[2] (Orthoinfo, 2015). She was three years old when the diagnosis was made, and at first, she was not allowed to walk. At age four to five she had to wear an iron shell around the right leg and a five cm high special shoe on … Read the rest

31 Jan: An Essay on Emotions in Regression Therapy – Hans TenDam (Is.30)

by Hans TenDam

Regression therapists deal with mind states: negative mind-sets that are recurrent and persistent, or positive mind-sets that are rare and elusive. If negative mind-sets are rare and elusive, or positive mind-sets are recurrent and persistent, people don’t need therapists.

Our mind-sets are coloring and flavoring our experiences and our behavior through our emotions. They are focusing and structuring our experiences and our behavior by our mental programs. They influence our physical condition, and they are influenced by our physical condition. It is difficult to be happy or angry when we are weak. It is difficult to be curious when we are sleepy.

How many different mind states are there? How many flavors are there? How many colors … Read the rest

17 Jul: Human and Non-Human Incarnations in Regression Therapy Sessions by Stopping the Internal Dialogue (Is.29)

by Pavel S.Gyngazov, MD

Abstract

The paper discusses the author’s techniques of inducing an altered state of consciousness during regression therapy sessions. Analyzing the alternation of human and non-human incarnations in the sessions with the same patient, the author demonstrates its accidental character and concludes that incarnations in all physical bodies are axiomatically equal in terms of experience gained.

The author also notes that all non-human incarnations are more harmonious than human ones.

A regression therapy session usually begins by inducing an altered state of consciousness in the patient. Of all techniques to facilitate this state, I prefer stopping the internal dialogue, which can be briefly described in the following way: patients focus their eyes on what they see … Read the rest

18 Jul: Development of Life Quality by Past Life Regression Therapy together with an Integrated Psychological Approach (Is.29)

by Tayat Sriplung * and Thawatchai Krisanaprakornkit**

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether past-life regression therapy can lead to better quality of life, more profound belief about moral consciousness, and better psychological well-being. This quasi-experimental research included a control group designed to test these hypotheses. Each experimental participant underwent three past life regression sessions facilitated by two qualified regression therapists, plus seven days of life improvement practice between each session. Participants in the experimental group had better scores in quality of life than those in the control group. Within the experimental group, scores on moral consciousness as well as quality of life and psychological well-being improved and was statistically significant. The roles of past life experiences Read the rest

17 Jul: Research Study: What Does Not Work in Regression Therapy – Paula Fenn (Is.29)

by Paula Fenn

an EARTh Research Committee Report

Abstract

This Research Report conveys a range of findings determined from a research study conducted with 15 regression therapists who were dominantly members of EARTh (80% EARTh, 20% non-EARTh). The topic of the study was, ‘What Does Not Work in Regression Therapy’ and the data was collected via questionnaires. The intention of this study was to generate data on this particular topic which would contribute to the field of knowledge within regression therapy also creating a reflective awareness about practice. The findings were analyzed using simplified versions of thematic and content analysis.

This methodological approach was adopted to structure the data into meaningful themes of problematic areas within which the study respondents Read the rest