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The Navajo Mountain Way Myth as a Metaphor for Past-Life Experience – Kathleen Jenks (Is.6)

by Kathleen Jenks, M.A. The Mountain Chant is a Navajo ceremony collected and translated in 1883-1884 by Washington Matthews, an army doctor stationed at Fort Wingate, New Mexico. The origin of the myth itself is unclear, but the resulting ceremony, based upon the requirement for specific items of ceremonial paraphernalia, can be dated at least as far back as the 1700’s. The ceremony can be celebrated only in the winter when rattlesnakes and bears are hibernating; it is sung to treat mental disturbances or uneasiness, which are considered “bear sickness,” and also fainting spells, as well as kidney and stomach problems attributed to a variety of mountain animals such as bears, snakes, weasels, and porcupines. The myth begins in the densely forested mountains of what is now northeastern Arizona and focuses on a young hero. The hero’s elderly father teaches him and his brother a sacred hunting ritual. The power

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The Origin of the Victim Role in Past-Life Guilt – Dree K. Miller (Is.6)

by Dree K. Miller, Ph.D. It is commonplace for therapists to hear the variety of ways in which their clients are victims. Some clients are victims of child abuse or dysfunctional family backgrounds. Some are victims of abusive relationships with mates, friends, employers, family. Others are the victims of circumstances, never being able to succeed in school, find and hold a job, or have even an adequate living environment. Occasionally there seem to be those who are just “victims of life.” Or could it be that they are the victims of past life? Within the context of past-life therapy the concept of victimization shifts from an external experience to an internal design. Being a victim is no longer a case of being “done to” but rather becomes a method or attempt to achieve spiritual growth. The active victim ran be angry, bitter, and resentful, frequently liberally spreading bitterness to others

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The Application of the Psychosynthesis Technique of Forgiveness to Past-Life Therapy – Nanette de Fuentes (Is.6)

by Nanette de Fuentes, Ph.D. The technique of embracing forgiveness for oneself is built upon a thorough understanding of guilt. Guilt is a pervasive emotion which when unresolved, can impair one’s psychological and spiritual growth. It is classically defined as “self-reproach and feelings of culpability” or “deserving of blame.” The various schools of psychological thought view the etiology and purpose of guilt in different ways. From a psychodynamic viewpoint, neurotic guilt emerges from an overly punitive or overly developed superego, from the constrictions of which therapy should be able to free one. This viewpoint contrasts with Reality Therapy, wherein guilt is seen as a valid reaction to a real transgression. Existentialists, on the other hand, view guilt not as a neurotic trait stemming from early childhood (a personality organization one ought not to have), but as the personal sense of “missed life challenges.” Then there is the transpersonal perspective, which

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Separation From The Source As An Initiator of Guilt – Ernest Pecci – Joanne Walsh (Is.6)

by Ernest Pecci, M.D. and Joanne Walsh The complexity of a human being is amazing, regardless of the fairly simple life he or she may seem to be leading. We cannot judge by a person’s behavior what is happening in his consciousness. Each of us has traveled a long time and our bodies and personal selves represent the sum of our defenses, of our self-judgments, and of the complexities of human existence. Joanne came to me six years ago. At that time she was a pale, frail housewife with low adrenal gland energy who seemed to have a relatively simple life as a compulsive mother taking care of her children. She had always resisted help from anyone, but her son had allergies and other problems, so she came for him. Only after she had met me and felt that she could be comfortable talking about the disturbing feelings she had

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Guilt: Facilitator and Inhibitor in the Growth of the Soul – Hazel Denning (Is.6)

by Hazel Denning, Ph.D. A sense of guilt underlies a large percentage of life’s problems. Guilt is the emotional feeling one has when any act has been committed which leaves a sense that the individual has done something “wrong” or “bad.” This feeling is accompanied by a conscious or unconscious belief that some kind of punishment is deserved and inevitable. In conformity with the law of attraction, the guilty person consistently attracts experiences that serve as a form of punishment, seldom recognizing, however, that the painful events are of his own making. In any analysis of guilt, it is important to recognize that it contains both positive and negative aspects. The importance of balance in all of the life processes is well understood, but it is not common knowledge that the law of balance, being an integral part of all our experiences, suggests that guilt, usually seen as unconstructive, can

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Releasing Trapped Energies Through Meditation on the Navajo Mountain Way Myth- Kathleen Jenks (Is.6)

by Kathleen Jenks, M.A. When I grasped the enormous paradigmatic relevance of the Navajo Mountain Way myth for regression therapy,[1] the direct result was a transformation of one of my own earlier lifetimes. The life in question first emerged in the 1970’s in a regression guided by my friend, the late Marcia Moore. I was a Native American woman, tribe undetermined, in a terrain of forests and meadows. My grandfather in that life practiced witchcraft and was determined to make me his protégé. I was equally determined to resist him because, although I had no knowledge of wiser paths, I loathed the sense of “darkness” I felt around him. In my forties, during one of our increasingly savage and bitter quarrels, I stumbled as I was backing away from him. He crushed my skull with a boulder before I could twist free. In my current lifetime he was my father.

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Too Guilty to Have My Child – Peace Roan (Is.6)

by Peace Roan, Ph.D. The deepest pain in my life sprang from the loss of my daughter Rebecca, whom I surrendered for adoption at birth. I saw her for only a few moments and then let her go because I distrusted my ability to care for her. In order to find peace of mind about this currently, I have struggled to understand why I became pregnant and why I allowed myself to get into a position in which adoption seemed the only option. And why did this happen to Rebecca? In the 20 years since her birth, the pain and sadness of this experience, far from diminishing, increased so that at times I felt debilitated. In my need to resolve these feelings of grief and anger, I instituted a search for Rebecca when she was 15, and I found her. After that I yearned for some sort of understanding that

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Freeing Stalemates in Relationships by the Resolution of Entity Attachments – Edith Fiore (Is.5)

by Edith Fiore, Ph.D. Since before recorded time men have been healed of their complaints by having spirits removed from them by priests, shamans, healers, and through concerted prayer. Throughout history and across all cultural levels the belief in spirit possession as a cause of illness, physical and mental, as well as misfortune, has persisted. Now at the end of the twentieth century, respected therapists are openly using and examining techniques that purport to remove the spirits of the dead from living people. Because of these healers’ successes, they are being taken seriously by greater numbers of their peers, and therapists are learning and using these techniques in ever-increasing numbers. In my clinical practice I have found that almost every patient is possessed by one or more earthbound spirits, who may or may not be the cause of the patient’s presenting problems and other symptoms. If these entities are not

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EXPERIENTIAL DATA. The Roots of Becoming a Therapist – Edward Reynolds (Is.5)

by Edward Reynolds, Ph.D. A philosophic thread runs through most of my past lives. The less I have been involved with others, the stronger and clearer this seems to be, so my task seems to be to gain the ability to hold onto this thread while being involved with the world. Also, in looking over these lifetimes, it seems as though I work on one facet at a time, holding onto each facet as well as possible while going on to something more difficult. It sometimes has appeared that the earlier lifetimes were the more harmonious, but scrutiny of them shows that there were fewer challenges, and staying centered and philosophical was easier. In an early life in Rome I found myself a woman, a poetess, who was witnessing Rome’s decline and was angry about it and felt powerless to do anything. It was a feminist feeling. I was privileged

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ONGOING RESEARCH. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders of Vietnam Veterans: A Proposal for Research and Therapeutic Healing Utilizing Depossession (Is.5)

Submitted by Maurice L. Albertson, Ph.D., Dan S. Ward, Ph.D., & Bill Baldwin, D.D.S., D.Min. Summarized and Critiqued by Nanette de Fuentes, Ph.D. This proposal, currently in the process of formulation by the Rocky Mountain Research Institute in Fort Collins, Colorado, will investigate the healing potential of releasement from human-attached consciousness in Vietnam Veterans suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Dr. Edith Fiore, a practicing psychologist, in her book The Unquiet Dead, has described signs and symptoms which indicate such attachment. An early formulation of this research proposal is presented here in order to share with Journal readers the difficulties and evolving clarification of a research study in areas of paranormal healing and past-life therapy.

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Healing Relationships Through Past-Life Regression: A New Paradigm – Clyde H. Reid (Is.5)

by Clyde H. Reid, Th.D. Past-life therapy often deals with issues that involve interpersonal relationships. Connections with mothers or fathers, relationships with children and spouses or with good friends, are often influenced by the information and insight that emerge from a past-life regression. However, the literature on past-life therapy tends to focus on intrapersonal material rather than relationships, which is surprising considering how many people seek therapy because of problems in a relationship. Conventionally, tracing current relationships to past lives is done with one person, and I will present some examples of this approach and its effectiveness. Following these I will describe a personal experience where several parties to a relationship were regressed together and shared the past-life experience they lived out mutually. It is proposed that this dual regression be explored as an expanded relationship experience. Tracing a Current Relationship to a Past Life Teri came because she felt

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Rescripting in Past Life Therapy: Personal Experiences – Chet Snow (Is.5)

by Chet B. Snow, Ph.D. There is no doubt that the concept of “rescripting,” or client intervention within the regression therapy process to alter seemingly “fixed” past life events and/or attitudes, is both controversial and exciting. Borrowed from the lexicon of hypnotherapy where such intervention into “real” or “imagined” events from the client’s current childhood is commonplace and often quite effective in leading to symptom removal, rescripting takes on new philosophical dimensions when applied to a past-life scenario. It seems to call into question such fundamental human issues as free will, karma, or the law of “cause and effect,” and even the chronological order of time itself. With such important matters involved, it is not surprising that this technique evokes strong reactions, both pro and con, from past-life therapists. Without pretending to discuss exhaustively, let alone resolve, these basic questions in this brief forum, I want to present some personal

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Rescripting: An Opinion – Hazel Denning (Is.5)

by Hazel Denning, Ph.D. Rescripting is a comparatively recent concept introduced by hypnotherapists to describe an intervention with clients who have painful memories. Suggesting that they rewrite the unpleasant event in their past, clients imagine the event to be as they would have liked it to be. For example, if their mothers rejected them at birth, they create a story in which they were lovingly accepted. This technique has been adopted by some past-life therapists to deal with traumatic events in a past life. Clients may or may not respond favorably to this suggestion, but when they do create their own version of the experience, there is often a feeling of relief and satisfaction. I had not favored this technique for reasons which will be made clear in the following article. However, at a recent workshop Dr. Chet Snow was selected as my client for purposes of demonstration. At one

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Regression Using Rescripting: Dr. Denning Regresses Dr. Snow – Hazel Denning (Is.5)

by Hazel Denning, PhD This regression took place during three days of research on the Mind Mirror at the Brentwood Psychological Center in Los Angeles. Senior therapists regressed each other or volunteers with both therapist and subject attached to Mind Mirror biofeedback monitors. In this regression Dr. Hazel Denning regressed Dr. Chet Snow. After a brief relaxation and balancing of the chakra centers, Dr. Snow was asked to repeat vigorously a phrase which had been identified previously as disturbing to him: “It is unfair!” This phrase took him back to a scene in 1772 in a French village called Angers. As a budding journalist of 26, he saw his father, an intolerant scientist, being refused church burial, all because of his having spat on a hypocritical priest who had come to give him absolution when he was dying. As a consequence of the spitting incident, not only was the father

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Using Rescripting to Transform Patterns and Address Core Issues – Treelight Green (Is.5)

by Treelight Green, Ph.D. Through the years of involvement in past-life work, spontaneous regressions, guiding myself, and being guided by others, I have created a style of working with past lives which to my knowledge is unique and effective. Reliving a past life can be a cathartic experience in releasing emotions and identifying thought patterns and beliefs from which one is operating. However, simply identifying the patterns and releasing the emotions is not always sufficient. A transformation of the past needs to take place in order truly to impact a person’s current life and insure that old patterns and beliefs do not repeat themselves. This can be done through transformational imaging and rescripting. Though each regression is a dynamic process and varies from person to person, there is a basic formula that I follow. The first step is to identify the pattern or belief that needs changing. What is not

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Rescripting in Prenatal, Perinatal, and Early Childhood Regression Work – Barbara Findeisen (Is.5)

by Barbara Findeisen, M.A., M.F.C.C. Peeling off roles and examining life scripting can lead to dramatic life changes. In the regression of my clients, it is possible to discover life scripts within the traumatic situations they have experienced. By returning to the traumas, the etiology of the scripting is uncovered, because during early traumas the organism imprints on survival patterns. As these experiences are relived, it is clear that the child makes decisions based on his interpretation of what is happening at the time and these decisions form the core belief behind the script. Case 1 In her regression to her prenatal state Anna at first experiences the womb as safe and comfortable. Anna:          The Light is here with me. I move her forward to when her mother learns she is pregnant. Anna:          Oh, oh, she doesn’t want me here! She’s scared. She doesn’t want me! She wants me to

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Rescripting: A Family of Therapeutic Techniques – Kenneth Kaisch (Is.5)

by Kenneth Kaisch, Ph.D. Rescripting is a hypnotic technique which is occasionally used in psychotherapy. It also refers to a family of related therapeutic techniques. Re-scripting per se involves the hypnotic addition of life experience in order to modify the patient’s felt experience of him/herself. It is most often used when the patient has an experience deficit that is so profound as to be debilitating. For example, a patient who had severely abusive parents may be so deprived of ordinary parental affection as to be unable to establish an adequate sense of self worth despite the use of ordinary therapeutic treatment. In cases such as this, rescripting is the treatment of choice. It is informative to consider the place of rescripting in the therapeutic armamentarium. Rescripting is the technical complement of reframing. Reframing is a more widely used therapeutic technique, and involves changing the context around a traumatic event: changing

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EXPERIENTIAL DATA. Loneliness From Another Lifetime – Barbara Lamb (Is.5)

by Barbara Lamb, M.F.C.C. In a demonstration to an APRT training group in March 1986, Dr. Ronald Jue regressed me into a past life which dealt with a current life problem concerning inappropriate grief. After the breakup of my first marriage I had adjusted and begun to enjoy my freedom as a single person, believing that I would probably never marry again. I had just become comfortable in this set when at a California dinner party arranged by friends, I met Warren, the man who is my current husband. Warren was then on an around-the world business trip from his home and office in London. As he entered the doors and we were introduced, we each experienced a powerful reaction, an immediate recognition of each other. My thoughts were, “Oh, I know you. I already know you! What a surprise!” My mind became flooded with images of kin and long

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Karmic Patterns in Family Relationships – Dree Miller-Dunlap (Is.5)

by Dree K. Miller-Dunlap, Ph.D. It is within the context of the family that our experiences and knowledge of life in a physical body begin. The framework and interactions of the family provide the basis for a substantial amount of learning and are frequently the focus of psychotherapy. It therefore seems highly probable that the family plays a significant role in past-life therapy as well. It is within the family that the human being goes through the stages of development that bring one from birth to adulthood (and beyond). Consider the possibility that the stages of development observed in the human being may be a reflection of the stages of development of the spiritual being. In looking at how these stages are portrayed within the patterns of past lives (particularly with the same cast—the family), we may also be looking at the spiritual stages of development. Whenever one of these

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Core Issues In Relationships – Trisha Caetano (Is.5)

Trisha Caetano, B.S. The Structure of Core Issue Patterns A core issue is the result of an incident which causes an individual to form a viewpoint, feeling, or emotion that originates a pattern of behavior. Core issues are basic: anger, fear, control, worth, loss, guilt, etc. There can be one primary core issue active in a specific lifetime, with other issues associated with it or derived from it, or there can be more than one primary core issue in re-stimulation in a lifetime. For example, fear and guilt could be inexorably linked in the present, but could have originated in different lifetimes and therapeutically, must be dealt with individually. Core issues underline behavior, which is why, at best, behavior modification simply compounds existing coping mechanisms. The function of past-life regression therapy is to locate cause for the purpose of eliminating effect. To locate cause, the therapist must find the specific

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