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The Child Is Innocent: Releasing The Effects Of Child Abuse – Alice M. Givens (Is.7)

by Alice M. Givens, Ph.D. Even with the spotlight of publicity on child abuse today, confusion and misunderstanding reign regarding its occurrence. Hostility and even hatred of children exist in our culture and in other cultures as well, but the prevalence of abuse and the enormity of its effects are still not recognized. A large segment of the population still believes that child abuse is insignificant and are convinced that children lie about and exaggerate such abuse. When Freud first wrote about sexual abuse in 1896, his theory that neurosis was caused by sexual abuse in childhood drew a horrified reaction from medical and lay communities. Thus, he was forced to rescind his theory and shift the source of neurosis to the child’s fantasies of abuse, rather than to actual events. Today it is generally conceded that Freud changed his belief only because his work would not have been recognized

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Creative Source Therapy: Pathways for Healing the Inner Child – Errol D. Schubot (Is.7)

by Errol D. Schubot, Ph.D. The Creative Source is the inner wisdom and guidance that is most often accessed in spiritual, creative, or deep trance states. In a previous article in The Journal of Regression Therapy (Schubot, 1987), I demonstrated how Creative Source Therapy can be a very effective pathway to uncover and heal past-life experiences. This article further elaborates the procedures for using the Creative Source and demonstrates its effectiveness in healing the Inner Child. Creative Source Therapy uses the methods of Behavioral Kinesiology (Diamond, 1979; Callahan, 1985). It is a procedure that gives instant feedback of the body’s response to a stimulus through muscle testing. The client holds his arm out to the side with his palm facing down, while the therapist places the palm of this hand over the wrist of the extended arm and the other palm over the client’s opposite shoulder. About fifteen pounds of

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Induction to Childhood: Principles of Induction and Transformation – Henry Leo Bolduc (Is.7)

by Henry Leo Bolduc Present-life regression can be every bit as powerful and as healing as regression to a past life. If there is any secret to present-life regression, that secret lies mainly in simplicity rather than in any complicated techniques. One key to this simplicity is a careful explanation made to the subject before the session begins. Such advance preparation greatly facilitates recovery of material. Particularly important is the subject’s understanding of the various methods that individuals employ to process memory. In order to determine which method a subject will feel most comfortable using, the subject may be given an opportunity first to process a happy present-life memory. Whether this memory is an event that occurred five minutes before or five years earlier is unimportant. (If a pleasant memory cannot be found, a sad memory may be substituted). The way this memory is processed by the individual indicates the

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Principles and Techniques of Regression to Childhood – Irene Hickman (Is.7)

by Irene Hickman, D.O. Depressed feelings and thoughts often arise from other lifetimes, but they can also originate in the childhood of the subject’s current life. The process of recall and healing is the same, both for traumas originating in childhood and for those involving other lifetimes. Even if the source of a trauma is not found in a current lifetime, review of childhood memories is often helpful as a springboard to recall similar traumas from other lifetimes. This review is especially useful in the case of subjects who in their waking consciousness object to the idea of exploring past lives. Because of the trepidation often expressed by such subjects, I avoid beginning with past-life exploration and ask only that they move back to a time of significance for helping them to understand themselves. Usually we begin by reviewing their early childhood experiences. In exploration of childhood incidents, the time

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ONGOING RESEARCH. Mind Mirror Research on the Retrieval of Past Lives – Winafred B. Lucas (Is.7)

by Winafred B. Lucas, Ph.D. This report covers the first of three extended research sessions with the Mind Mirror. The two further sessions, where the subject matter was extended to include releasement work, recollection of child abuse, and channeling will be reported in a later issue. Background The effort to document physiological correlates of inner states is relatively recent. It began with three biofeedback instruments: the temperature meter, the OSE, which measures stress and relaxation through skin resistance; and a simple electroencephalogram. (The first electroencephalographic recordings picked up only one brain wave pattern at a time—the dominant one—and for a while it was not clear that the brain actually produced waves on different levels at the same time). Gradually various feedback devices made it possible to measure and record bodily changes that before that time had been considered unavailable to consciousness. Their measurement and recording opened the door to an

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Using Past-Life Concepts in Child Therapy – Evelyn Fuqua (Is.7)

by Evelyn Fuqua, Ph.D., M.F.C.C. The primary goal of therapy with children is to strengthen self-esteem. In working with children I do not advocate using regression therapy except in cases where all other methods have failed to help the child. One must always use caution since the ego strength of children is quite fragile. Children need to develop a sense of their unique personality and talents of this lifetime. However, the metaphysical concepts of past lives can at times be used very effectively with children. I have found four major methods of using regression concepts in working with children: 1) Using hypnotherapy, with the therapist giving suggestions to the child; 2) Encouraging a child to talk about a past life which has spontaneously surfaced as the result of stress; 3) Discussing difficult relationships in the child’s life in the context of reincarnation; and 4) Discussing dreams which are recurrent. A

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The Weighing of the Heart and Other Hells: Guilt and Fear as Inhibitors in the Process of Transition – Winafred B. Lucas (Is.6)

by Winafred B. Lucas, Ph.D. In a recent stay in Egypt I deepened my understanding of the nature of entity attachments. Our group of 23, under the leadership of Dr. Brugh Joy, was spending a week riding camels across the Sinai and climbing mountains there. During a particularly steep climb, in which a fixed rope was used to assist the ascent, the rope broke and the person on it, Mark, fell some distance, scraping rocks on the way down and landing on his left ankle in a shallow pool. Several of the men carried him back to where the camels had been left, where the group, many of whom were healers, succeeded in reducing the inflammation. However, the possibility of a ruptured Achilles tendon led Brugh to decide that Mark should return on the most dependable camel, along with a companion and two guides, to the Gulf of Akaba, where

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Overcoming Resistance to a Past-Life Scene – Garrett Oppenheim (Is.6)

by Garrett Oppenheim, Ph.D. One of my most challenging cases of resistance was that of a young man of executive fiber who appeared to be well motivated, and whose regressions were both vivid and interesting. However, these regressions seemed to have nothing to do with his presenting problem, which was a profound fear of speaking in front of an audience. We worked under pressure because he had allowed only a few weeks to deal with this problem before giving an important talk which, if successful, would clinch a promotion to a higher executive position in his company. My patient, Monty, had regressed to lifetimes as a prostitute in Algeria, a farmer in southern England, and a caveman in some unknown locale, but the one life to which he kept returning was that of one Harry Dixon, an American infantryman in World War II. Again, none of these regressions seemed pertinent.

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The Navajo Mountain Way Myth as a Metaphor for Past-Life Experience – Kathleen Jenks (Is.6)

by Kathleen Jenks, M.A. The Mountain Chant is a Navajo ceremony collected and translated in 1883-1884 by Washington Matthews, an army doctor stationed at Fort Wingate, New Mexico. The origin of the myth itself is unclear, but the resulting ceremony, based upon the requirement for specific items of ceremonial paraphernalia, can be dated at least as far back as the 1700’s. The ceremony can be celebrated only in the winter when rattlesnakes and bears are hibernating; it is sung to treat mental disturbances or uneasiness, which are considered “bear sickness,” and also fainting spells, as well as kidney and stomach problems attributed to a variety of mountain animals such as bears, snakes, weasels, and porcupines. The myth begins in the densely forested mountains of what is now northeastern Arizona and focuses on a young hero. The hero’s elderly father teaches him and his brother a sacred hunting ritual. The power

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The Origin of the Victim Role in Past-Life Guilt – Dree K. Miller (Is.6)

by Dree K. Miller, Ph.D. It is commonplace for therapists to hear the variety of ways in which their clients are victims. Some clients are victims of child abuse or dysfunctional family backgrounds. Some are victims of abusive relationships with mates, friends, employers, family. Others are the victims of circumstances, never being able to succeed in school, find and hold a job, or have even an adequate living environment. Occasionally there seem to be those who are just “victims of life.” Or could it be that they are the victims of past life? Within the context of past-life therapy the concept of victimization shifts from an external experience to an internal design. Being a victim is no longer a case of being “done to” but rather becomes a method or attempt to achieve spiritual growth. The active victim ran be angry, bitter, and resentful, frequently liberally spreading bitterness to others

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The Application of the Psychosynthesis Technique of Forgiveness to Past-Life Therapy – Nanette de Fuentes (Is.6)

by Nanette de Fuentes, Ph.D. The technique of embracing forgiveness for oneself is built upon a thorough understanding of guilt. Guilt is a pervasive emotion which when unresolved, can impair one’s psychological and spiritual growth. It is classically defined as “self-reproach and feelings of culpability” or “deserving of blame.” The various schools of psychological thought view the etiology and purpose of guilt in different ways. From a psychodynamic viewpoint, neurotic guilt emerges from an overly punitive or overly developed superego, from the constrictions of which therapy should be able to free one. This viewpoint contrasts with Reality Therapy, wherein guilt is seen as a valid reaction to a real transgression. Existentialists, on the other hand, view guilt not as a neurotic trait stemming from early childhood (a personality organization one ought not to have), but as the personal sense of “missed life challenges.” Then there is the transpersonal perspective, which

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Separation From The Source As An Initiator of Guilt – Ernest Pecci – Joanne Walsh (Is.6)

by Ernest Pecci, M.D. and Joanne Walsh The complexity of a human being is amazing, regardless of the fairly simple life he or she may seem to be leading. We cannot judge by a person’s behavior what is happening in his consciousness. Each of us has traveled a long time and our bodies and personal selves represent the sum of our defenses, of our self-judgments, and of the complexities of human existence. Joanne came to me six years ago. At that time she was a pale, frail housewife with low adrenal gland energy who seemed to have a relatively simple life as a compulsive mother taking care of her children. She had always resisted help from anyone, but her son had allergies and other problems, so she came for him. Only after she had met me and felt that she could be comfortable talking about the disturbing feelings she had

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Guilt: Facilitator and Inhibitor in the Growth of the Soul – Hazel Denning (Is.6)

by Hazel Denning, Ph.D. A sense of guilt underlies a large percentage of life’s problems. Guilt is the emotional feeling one has when any act has been committed which leaves a sense that the individual has done something “wrong” or “bad.” This feeling is accompanied by a conscious or unconscious belief that some kind of punishment is deserved and inevitable. In conformity with the law of attraction, the guilty person consistently attracts experiences that serve as a form of punishment, seldom recognizing, however, that the painful events are of his own making. In any analysis of guilt, it is important to recognize that it contains both positive and negative aspects. The importance of balance in all of the life processes is well understood, but it is not common knowledge that the law of balance, being an integral part of all our experiences, suggests that guilt, usually seen as unconstructive, can

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Releasing Trapped Energies Through Meditation on the Navajo Mountain Way Myth- Kathleen Jenks (Is.6)

by Kathleen Jenks, M.A. When I grasped the enormous paradigmatic relevance of the Navajo Mountain Way myth for regression therapy,[1] the direct result was a transformation of one of my own earlier lifetimes. The life in question first emerged in the 1970’s in a regression guided by my friend, the late Marcia Moore. I was a Native American woman, tribe undetermined, in a terrain of forests and meadows. My grandfather in that life practiced witchcraft and was determined to make me his protégé. I was equally determined to resist him because, although I had no knowledge of wiser paths, I loathed the sense of “darkness” I felt around him. In my forties, during one of our increasingly savage and bitter quarrels, I stumbled as I was backing away from him. He crushed my skull with a boulder before I could twist free. In my current lifetime he was my father.

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Too Guilty to Have My Child – Peace Roan (Is.6)

by Peace Roan, Ph.D. The deepest pain in my life sprang from the loss of my daughter Rebecca, whom I surrendered for adoption at birth. I saw her for only a few moments and then let her go because I distrusted my ability to care for her. In order to find peace of mind about this currently, I have struggled to understand why I became pregnant and why I allowed myself to get into a position in which adoption seemed the only option. And why did this happen to Rebecca? In the 20 years since her birth, the pain and sadness of this experience, far from diminishing, increased so that at times I felt debilitated. In my need to resolve these feelings of grief and anger, I instituted a search for Rebecca when she was 15, and I found her. After that I yearned for some sort of understanding that

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Freeing Stalemates in Relationships by the Resolution of Entity Attachments – Edith Fiore (Is.5)

by Edith Fiore, Ph.D. Since before recorded time men have been healed of their complaints by having spirits removed from them by priests, shamans, healers, and through concerted prayer. Throughout history and across all cultural levels the belief in spirit possession as a cause of illness, physical and mental, as well as misfortune, has persisted. Now at the end of the twentieth century, respected therapists are openly using and examining techniques that purport to remove the spirits of the dead from living people. Because of these healers’ successes, they are being taken seriously by greater numbers of their peers, and therapists are learning and using these techniques in ever-increasing numbers. In my clinical practice I have found that almost every patient is possessed by one or more earthbound spirits, who may or may not be the cause of the patient’s presenting problems and other symptoms. If these entities are not

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EXPERIENTIAL DATA. The Roots of Becoming a Therapist – Edward Reynolds (Is.5)

by Edward Reynolds, Ph.D. A philosophic thread runs through most of my past lives. The less I have been involved with others, the stronger and clearer this seems to be, so my task seems to be to gain the ability to hold onto this thread while being involved with the world. Also, in looking over these lifetimes, it seems as though I work on one facet at a time, holding onto each facet as well as possible while going on to something more difficult. It sometimes has appeared that the earlier lifetimes were the more harmonious, but scrutiny of them shows that there were fewer challenges, and staying centered and philosophical was easier. In an early life in Rome I found myself a woman, a poetess, who was witnessing Rome’s decline and was angry about it and felt powerless to do anything. It was a feminist feeling. I was privileged

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ONGOING RESEARCH. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders of Vietnam Veterans: A Proposal for Research and Therapeutic Healing Utilizing Depossession (Is.5)

Submitted by Maurice L. Albertson, Ph.D., Dan S. Ward, Ph.D., & Bill Baldwin, D.D.S., D.Min. Summarized and Critiqued by Nanette de Fuentes, Ph.D. This proposal, currently in the process of formulation by the Rocky Mountain Research Institute in Fort Collins, Colorado, will investigate the healing potential of releasement from human-attached consciousness in Vietnam Veterans suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Dr. Edith Fiore, a practicing psychologist, in her book The Unquiet Dead, has described signs and symptoms which indicate such attachment. An early formulation of this research proposal is presented here in order to share with Journal readers the difficulties and evolving clarification of a research study in areas of paranormal healing and past-life therapy.

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Healing Relationships Through Past-Life Regression: A New Paradigm – Clyde H. Reid (Is.5)

by Clyde H. Reid, Th.D. Past-life therapy often deals with issues that involve interpersonal relationships. Connections with mothers or fathers, relationships with children and spouses or with good friends, are often influenced by the information and insight that emerge from a past-life regression. However, the literature on past-life therapy tends to focus on intrapersonal material rather than relationships, which is surprising considering how many people seek therapy because of problems in a relationship. Conventionally, tracing current relationships to past lives is done with one person, and I will present some examples of this approach and its effectiveness. Following these I will describe a personal experience where several parties to a relationship were regressed together and shared the past-life experience they lived out mutually. It is proposed that this dual regression be explored as an expanded relationship experience. Tracing a Current Relationship to a Past Life Teri came because she felt

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Rescripting in Past Life Therapy: Personal Experiences – Chet Snow (Is.5)

by Chet B. Snow, Ph.D. There is no doubt that the concept of “rescripting,” or client intervention within the regression therapy process to alter seemingly “fixed” past life events and/or attitudes, is both controversial and exciting. Borrowed from the lexicon of hypnotherapy where such intervention into “real” or “imagined” events from the client’s current childhood is commonplace and often quite effective in leading to symptom removal, rescripting takes on new philosophical dimensions when applied to a past-life scenario. It seems to call into question such fundamental human issues as free will, karma, or the law of “cause and effect,” and even the chronological order of time itself. With such important matters involved, it is not surprising that this technique evokes strong reactions, both pro and con, from past-life therapists. Without pretending to discuss exhaustively, let alone resolve, these basic questions in this brief forum, I want to present some personal

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